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the religion to be in crisis. here is cbs news correspondent allen pizzey reporting from rome. >> reporter: with his brief announcement in latin, benedict set a modern peres sent that ensures his successor cans take the same path. as one cardinal put it-- he broke a taboo. catholics around the world reacted with surprise, some sadness but overall there was a sense that benedict had done the right thing for himself and the church. >> it's quite an act of humility for the pope to realize he can no longer physically and mentally discharge the duties of his author. >> even as benedict's legacy is being debated, the struggle for succession has begun behind the scenes. latin americans feel their time has come and there are several strong candidates, including cardinal leonardo sandri of argentina. the region is home to 42% of the world's catholics and the church needs a bulwark against gains made by evangelical christians. africa has the fastest-growing catholic population. ghanaian cardinal peter turkson, who's only 64, tops many lists to be the first black pope. the strongest european candidat
, and i mean-- i do not mean this to be in any way disrespectful toward religion-- but is it like a political convention? do you have people getting together feeling each other out? because one of you is going to be elected to this job. what's it like inside one of those conclaves? >> well, before the conclave actually start, there are a number of days when all the cardinals come together so that we can actually talk among ourselves, begin to get a better sense of one another. there are going to be 117 of us there with the right to vote. and just to get to know a little bit better personally one another, there will be four or five days of these meetings. but it-- >> schieffer: will you in any way-- could you be the nominee? >> no, that-- that enters into the world of fantasy. but when we get back into the real world i think what will happen is a number of cardinals will begin to surface in the conversation among all of us as particularly appealing candidates. it's not like a political process, though. there aren't nominations, and you don't have people saying, "i vote for..." and
think or don't think about religion this politics and -- in politics and how so many of the views that we believe, all of us, are carefully reasoned and thought out are grounded in some deeper attitudes, some deeper values, some deeper life experiences, what i call world views that really shape our more specific beliefs both in religion and in politics. .. the essential chart for understanding the consequences of our budget conundrum. what it shows is as of may of 2011, the center for budget policy and policies and priorities, based on cbo numbers, this shows part of the annual deficits that are due to the war in iraq and afghanistan, the bush era tax cuts, recovery measures, that means primarily the bush stimulus and obama stimulus program and the economic downturn, you can still make it out and you can see from where we are today in 2013 at the time this was put together the single biggest factor in the annual deficits that we will experience over the next several years, not from the economic slowdown but because of the revenues that were taken away by the bush tax cuts. as we a
had been misused. history, like many religions, is multi vocal. that is, it is valuable. can be interpreted and deployed in ways that consciously, strategically or not simply suit the interests of the interpreter . so history can be useful. it can also be misused and even abused, but by scholars and practitioners. .. he had a sensationalist view of history. there was a novelty in the present moment. example includes the recent book "smuggler nation: how illicit trade made america." hijacking is a pretty sensational term to me. so how do peter andreas do it in this book? well, i think that he skillfully avoids in providing this present perspective. the other extreme that there is nothing new under the sun. i think this is most clear in the balance chapter, there is a subheading that is quite telling. so some things are new. for example, some of them do have greater global reach even if the extent of this reach has been exaggerated by the journalist and people of hollywood. it is indeed probably larger than it used to be historically. and there is also a relative share of illic
viewing homosexuality as a sin. >> it's been said that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
are a school, so we teach the art of gospel music. so it doesn't matter what religion you are. but i think that gospel music was birthed out of a need to be spiritual or to be religious or to have hope and possibility and joy in your life, you know, especially during those really difficult times. and it sort of takes us through a journey of our life in america, you know, whether you go from traditional gospel songs or slave songs or folk songs. >> vy explained that one of the goals of the program is to keep the spirit of gospel alive. >> as we auditioned people for events, we find out that they were not able to sing a whole gospel song all the way through. so, therefore, we felt that it was important now to make sure that we infuse these young people with the history and culture and let them know who they are and where they come from musically so that they would be able to pass the music on for generation and generation to come. >> by the end of the audition, these teens are already learning to let their light shine. >> ♪ let it shine, let it shine, let it shi-i-i-i-ne ♪ [ cheers and a
of religions. >> guest: i would woo say at it more complex. i find these a clash of civilize and other concept related to this rather simplistic, and by now, ten years -- more than ten years after 9/11, we should be aware of the complexity of what is happening on the ground abroad where america is involved in various wars. i final that many of these conflicts are rooted in the clash already taking place before 9/11 between central government and the tribes and communities on their borders, on the areas between states. so, therefore, without an understanding of local culture or history, it's impossible to implosion immiss stick notions. i know we here in the united states sigh this as a class of civilization but talk to one? iran or yemen and they will just look aghast at the concept there's a clash of civilizations. 90% of the survey had no idea what 9/11 was or who osama bin laden was. so, of there, we have to be very careful of how we are analyzing the contemporary world, and i maintain there's a crisis already existing in those parts of the world that the united states has now drifted into
be applied to religion. >> here in the bay area, issues that we often are associated with the catholic church and the catholics discuss, gay marriage, women in the priesthood, child abuse by the clergy are sort of preimminent. do you think that will be reflected in the conclave? what are their priority in the. >> certainly all those things will be on their minds. there is a clear direction forward for greater transparency, complete transparency in the church and working with the states with respect to sexual abuse in the church. for the other issues, the changes in the order and social issues of the church, church leadership is the spokes person for the rest of the church. they listen to the faithful and make no major changes that they see in way would scandal them. >> it will be interesting. the catholic church is one of the oldest political institutions in the western world. >> and speaking of politics -- >>> the latest punchline on the colbert report in the state of california. >> obviously i don't trust the state completely because off bear on your flag! >> california's lieutenant g
. the campus club was formed a year ago. ignite member, danny phan, says the events main focus was not religion, but about different forms of love. "we feel valentines day has really been cheapened. love is kind of superficial but we're here to spread positivity and a different kind of love." performer saylah, hopes those viewing and passing by the event received his, as well as ignites message about love. " "just by showing them no matter what, they don't need to do anything. god loves them. we love them. i want to stand for something. i felt it had a great purpose." young hopes that those who came to the event received the organizations message. "i just pray for encounters today. as we play music, as we have different performers go up and speakers, people would have opened their ears to hear." standup - students who want more information about ignite can go to their website at igniterolcc.com. live on campus this is saushe young, update news." many people are no doubt still caught up in the afterglow of valentines day, and here on campus students were able to express their affection for the p
that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
they have daily and meaningful contact with a person of another race or religion. and then i had another trial after this was done in another jurisdiction that shall go unnamed, and i would say there were maybe 5 percent of the jurors, potential jurors, who had had meaningful contact with a person of a different race or ethnicity and that's really what this is about. one of my least favorite words is the word tolerance because, you know, i tolerate brussel sprouts but if you simply tolerate the diversity that is america, you are going to, you are aspiring for mediocrity. when we have, and this gets back to your question, when we have leaders that embrace diversity and that build a culture that says, you know what, if you want to compete in the global economy tomorrow, pal, you've got to embrace diversity. why does coca-cola write a brief to the united states supreme court and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company,
launched an interfaith speakers bureau where we take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been
there is no religion in the program. >> to say it's watered down or defanged of its religious tenets is simply in this case not true. >> the program funded by a yoga nonprofit group is supported by most of the parents and the students. starting the classes in january, students apparently are much calmer. >> that's yoga. >> see what happens. >>> facebook and google teaming up to help you live a little longer. >> they are giving millions of dollars to scientists who are working on cures for diseases and extending life. >> i think that our society needs more heroes who are scientists and researchers and engineers. and you guys are doing all the amazing work. and the thing that we can do from the sidelines is build institutions that celebrate and reward and recognize all of the real work that you guys are doing. >> other sponsors include google cofounder sergey brin and apple's art levinson. so far the group has raised over $30 million for what is called the breakthrough prize. >>> a michigan woman wants to be honest about her age but facebook just won't let h
civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimney rock in southwest colorado. and it's over 8,000 feet. and you are up at the southern end ftd rocky mountains and there is this scarp of rock that rises up probably about a thousand feet out of a valley floor and right at the tip of this scarp there are two twin towers of rock. if you get to a certain place on top of this very narrow butte, you can see between these twin towers and there happens to be a great house built between these two towers and every 18.6 years when the moon goes into its northernmost point on the horizon, it rises between those two towers. i was there at the beginning of the last 18.6 year cycle and we stood up there, probably 20 of us, researchers, forest service people, all gathered at the same spot with cameras and huddled -- it was late december at 8,000 feet and we were
our religion? i don't think so. i think it's the people. >>> a montana gun law is proposing a new sheriffs first bill which would allow county sheriffs to pick and choose which federal laws they want to enforce in their state. as garry more bit told "mother jones" might say that we have probable cause to say we have this person in our county who's making firearms without a license and the sheriff might say, well, gosh, under the montana fiearms freedom act, he might say you don't have permission for this bust. it was cleared by a vote by the state's republican-led house judiciary committee just this week. >>> people, who do you think really has got the short end of the stick when it comes to the looming spending cuts that are said to hit on march 1st? well, consider the guy who's korz nating 800,000 defense department layoffs that will happen as a result. that would be pentagon comptroller robert heale taking it in stride. he said when i walk down the hall, they still wave, but with fewer fingers. >>> that's it for "hardball." coming up next, "your business with j.j. ramberg." n c
drowning out the voice of religion, the voice of faith. >> cardinal wool also says he thinks it's unlikely the next pope will be an american because the united states is considered the world's one great superpower. >>> a virginia family hoping and praying for the arrival of their little boy, a boy they already call their son. maxim right now lives 5,000 miles away in a russian orphanage. he's been there his entire 14 years. >> as andrea mccarren reports, he's one held hostage by an adoption ban posed last night. >> words can't describe how i feel. i told him today, max, you just cannot fathom how much we love you. >> maxim captured the hearts of diana and mill years ago when they met the boy on a church trip. they helped transform the orphanage into a better place to house children. >> no doubt at all, he's absolutely our son. >> abandoned as a baby, maxim has spent all 14 years in bleak russian orphanages. his stature may be small, but the wallens say his heart is huge. >> he had a spirit about him a lot of the children didn't have. he was smiling and happy, very curious, always wanted af
more powerfully than its religion, and the african american inner city is strong and growing strong under jim crow. monday night at 10:00 on mpt. >> catch a free look at upcoming programs and events and find it online. >> programs on
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
regimes in which the freedom of religion is understood to be a completely private matter. in the statement by mendelssohn, in connection with france, he said to be a citizen in the streets but a jew at home, but that is not the message you get from the stable of kosher food in philadelphia. it is ok to be a jew in public, too. it is not a matter of expressing to the private. the spirit of freedom is perhaps unique to the united states in the world, but even here, even with that kind of sounding, and even with the words of the first amendment to express that, things have not always been so happy, and especially not always so happy for minorities in america. he was not then chief justice but the man who was going to become chief justice of the supreme court fought on the convention to exclude roman catholics. it was a big fight. he was defeated alternately, but that was an attempt, and it was not long after, and that was a time when catholics constituted less than 1% of the population of the united states and were no threat out all. as larger numbers of roman catholics came to these shores,
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religions, actual religions and i think that, look, there's ways that people can take days off for their special days. i think though that you're going to be looked at funny if you insist you need halloween off. i think it's insulting if you're a wiccan or a pagans and if you're an atheist or a pagans, if you're celebrating nature, an everyday experience. >> tucker: only a country too rich too long could be this frivolous and silly. the statements from the school, the information about the wiccan and pagans holidays, the statement says, has been in the guide since last fall. keep in mind this is not intended just for faculty, this is an informational guide for anyone across campus. letting you know. >> letting you know which days you can take. >> tucker: and christianity and comes down to-- >> i think that there's a rejection of tradition. i think this is again, not about elevating anyone else, it's about paganses and wiccans used for a political agenda to downgrade what's important to a majority of americans. i think that this is an anti-tradition action. i think paganses and
appeals court said that prisoner that are part of the pagan religion can use a chaplain. catholics, muslims, jewish, profession -- protestants -- have chaplains. >>> u.s. security firm claims that it traced massive number of hacking attacks. hackers in that building have stolen hundreds of information from american corporations, organizations and government agencies. chinese leaders are denying the allegations. they say that china is also a victim of cyber attacks that have originated in the united states. >>> we all know the dangers of lasers pointed at pilots but did you also know that pointing a laser on people on the ground can be very dangerous and cause serious damage. that's happening more than you might think. david stevenson reports. >> reporter: thompson spends long hours in front of a monitor designing computer graphics. thompson and other passengers boarded a smaller sailboat for a sunset cruise. he says someone in an apartment building .25-mile away began hitting the boat with a laser. >> i felt like a sering -- searing like you get burned really quickly. >> it appar
] it was all very emotional. never mentioned. [inaudible] put me in jail or barred my religion. so it was hard for me to give up my citizenship. the land behind me. is it great to be an american? and don't know. >> we open the book with a vivid scene for 1968. just flown to reno nevada to get a quickie divorce in the days before no-fault divorce, very, very difficult to get a divorce back then. it had to be someone's fault, and it was not easy. she came back was in a bit of a state. she drove her car directly into the middle of downtown d.c. the morning after the night martin luther king was assassinated in this city, they just exploded. the 1960's in 1968 was a time of major turmoil and change in the that states, and it was also a huge time of change in your life because you get -- you did something that was difficult, you get a divorce after a very long marriage. it was the time when the women's movement was really beginning to get under way in the united states. i was impressed that you were not inspired by the women's movement. it was something else. [inaudible] >> said to a lot of reading
is insufficiently respectful of religion despite its religious heritage and most elite academia in america. they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. or to keynesian. they are quasi-socialist. rusher agreed with all of that. but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law, brent purcell's 1964 book in which they save mccarthy has been a little too rough. he's made errors of judgment, but that causes really important and is being treated unfairly. that's exactly where rusher is a 1954, 55, 56. and here's her for he turns from the generic republican republicanism too hard movement conservatives them. there is a bit of a conservative movement before national review in 1955, but it was a little -- it was disorganized. the polite term might be entrepreneurial, individualistic whittaker chambers cited as the people popping out by kravitz. you never knew where they were coming from, where they were going. you might see this again now and then. rusher is thrilled to hear there is going to be a conservative weekly magazine. at the time its weekly. s
's the american riviera. >> i love it. great food, you can get married, find religion, and sometimes all in the same beautiful place. >> i want to die there. >> me too. ♪ >> santa barbara. where the mountains meet the ocean. the sun kisses the sky. and the only thing better than the fine wine is the five-star food. for tens of thousands of tourists every year, their first introduction to santa barbara happens aboard the landshark. part bus, part boat, the landshark starts on the street and ends up in the harbor. >> three, two, one! splash down! >> such a picturesque city, allows you to see everything from the land, to the water. check out the sea lions. back on land, santa barbara county features some of the most expensive properties in california, including the exclusive community of montecito, home to celebrities like oprah winfrey, ellen degeneres and rob lowe. >> the mission helping the poor remains the number one tourist draw in santa barbara. >> people do meet god here. >> father richard mcmanis is one of 14 brothers who have taken a vow of poverty, chastity, and obedience. to ca
. the officials say they are not teaching religion and called classes part of the physical fitness program and adds they no plans to get rids of the yoga classes. >> in royal news, is prince harry in love? sorry, ladies, he could be off the market. for now. he was spotted with the new flame at an exclusive ski resort in switzerland. they started day dating in may of last year but this is the first time they have been photographed together. "good morning america" will have much more on the lovebirds at 7:00 and the relationship they are working so hard to keep a secret. >> the white house is not a secret has released the first lady's new more -- portrait. it was taken in the white house friend room. you can compare with her previous official portrait with her much talked about new bangs this is start add trend and she referred to as being the mid-life crisis. but it works. she looks great no matter what. >> cheaper than a sports car. >> now the weather forecast. >> easier to maintain. >> a little hair spray and gel, all good. >> now, everyone, a little bit quieter, you can probably put appe
remember barack obama's 2008 promise. it is not surprising. they cling to guns our religion. the arrogance of their superiority requires this. they don't rule less. they don't give us rights. we grant them power. lou: meanwhile, organizing for action targeting 13 republican lawmakers, urging them to back universal background checks. those ads running on the web sites of local news outlets, individually tailored for the photos and twitter handle of the congressman to be this one targeting congressman buck mckeon, the head of the house armed services committee. forbes magazine releasing its list of the most miserable cities in this country. illus takes into account various factors, including the unemployment rates, violent crime foreclosures, income, property taxes, even weather and commuting time. modesto california, chicago. rockford, illinois, plan, michigan. the first the nearly bankrupt detroit. we may have rent chicago ourselves a bit higher given all the problems they have. up next in the present dispatching his lone republican cabinet member to scare somebody , of course. ♪ the "a-
, the religion of a people. from my perspective, the economy of a group is one of the most powerful determinants of human behavior. keach: to archaeologists, all economies fall somewhere on a spectrum from simple to complex. in a simple economy, people grow or gather all the food they eat. they make all the things they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items
of religion, but on the basis of humanity because we believe we're all human beings and we are muslims, christians, hindus. today we have christians, bishops, pastors, muslims, hindus and s ikhs as a symbol of our unity, assemble people of pakistan belonged to one family. >> in his release soldier has ignited controversy after posting a photograph to a social networking site that appears to show a palestinian boy in the cross hairs of a sniper rifle. mor ostrovski, a sniper in the military of israel, posted the photo to his instagram site. it shows a palestinian boy facing away from the camera with a gun cross hairs focused on the side of his head. the israeli military says it is investigating. in britain, journalists with the bbc walked off the job monday in a 24-hour strike against job cuts, temporarily canceling many of the broadcaster's shows. protesting workers launched picket lines outside bbc studios across the country. the national union of journalists says some 2000 jobs are at stake. another labor action is underway in spain where workers at the airline iberia have launched a
, it is more of a religion, we need to have an o objective discussion n that,. neil: caroline this begs a question to the 68 som 68 odd wt on the climate change. >> it has gone to a variety of programs but not enough. neil: that not enough? >> we're talking about catastrophic, what we're experiencing right now. neil: where has that money gone to? >> for breaks for clean energy, and local programs for transportation, all of which cut down on our addiction to fossil fuel, 2010, 11, and 12 have been hottest years on record. >> what? >> superstorm sandy and other superstorms have doubled in last 15 years. neil: i read a prompter on tv, i think that qualified me as an expert. if this proves to be coldest winter, it is not done yet, in 20 something odd years, does that jive with warmest global temperaturesn the last 3 years? can you spill have your environmental cake and eat it too. >> absolutely. we're talking about difference between weather and climate, it is not going to be cold. >> no matter the weather it is climate change. neil: i love you, but you cannot win. >> neil let me answer. ne
. >> reporter: and he repackages religion in a very unusual way. he's also a professional rapper, and preaches religion with rhyme. >> sometimes you have to do a little hip-hop, too. >> reporter: during a sermon? >> if need be. ♪ i'm trying to live it like christ ♪ >> reporter: as a rapper around the chicago area, the reverend is known as jay quest. >> what it really does is hopefully lead people into a greater understanding and awareness of themselves and their god. >> reporter: he's been preaching for ten years, he's been rapping professionally for about five years. they don't seem like they go together. but apparently they do. >> i don't think that i rap religion, though. i think that i rap about life, and i rap about the narratives of all of our experiences. i think that's the same thing that sermons are about. >> reporter: sermons and rap, the two have met. frank mathy, abc 7 news. >> whatever it takes. >> whatever gets the message out there is a good thing. so different people respond to different things. i like it. >> especially if you want to get to the younger demographic. that's
that was abandoned, and there's a lot of other religion, the left turned against religion. when it was half of the movement's inspiration and half of the dr. king's magnificent formula of equal souls, equal votes, a foot in the scriptures one foot in the constitution, and the next thing you know, people are turning against the spiritual base of democracy. we misrememberedded the civil war for a century. when i grew up in atlanta; the textbook said it had nothing to do with slavery. we got a lot of sentimental gone with the wind, and to this day, textbooks in history refer to the political movement that overthrew the reconstruction governments after the civil war and restored white supremacy in the south paving the way for segregation, referred, the textbooks refer to the movement as the redeemers. the redeemers redeemed the south. the religious word that in reality was accomplished by terror. terrorism as much as the terrorism that plaged the world that we're attuned to when it's not among us. it turned race -- race has the power of turning our sense of perception upside down. that's the te
of religion. first amendment fight that everybody at home, you've got to tune in it for it. listen to see how avery and richard see it. >>> also coming up, cops are baffled about the case of a young woman found dead in a hotel water tank. but it's not the first time bizarre and frightening things have occurred at the cecil hotel. it's got a very twisted history. >>> and we've all seen first lady michelle obama dancing with the president. right? have you ever seen her hit the dance floor like this before? not showing you yet. you have to tune in to see. >>> first, you're perhaps looking for a sun-splashed island to go to along with a dose of ancient history. greece has all of that. holly ferfer shows you how. >> reporter: greece really wants tourism dollars, and that's great for travelers. >> one of the great things about troovm greece right now, especially during the economic crisis, are hungry for travellers to visit the country. you can find a lot of great deals and discounts in greece right now. >> reporter: there are a few must-see stop ls. >> you definitely want to start in athens. that'
then that they get bitter king to guns or religion or antipathy towards people who aren't like them, or anti-immigrant sentiment or antitrade center. as with a toy to explain their frustrations. >> the comments became a big part of the discussion on the left-right culture war. republicans were happy to publicize his comments, but these days they're terrified they might be losing the culture wars on some front, and they may well will. let's look at the grounds on gay marriage. once unthinkable, nine states and the district of columbia have legalized same-sex marriage either by court degree, legislative action or actual popular vote. and now illinois, delaware, and hawaii are also considering legalizing gay marriage, same-sex marriage. and the rights retreat on cultural issues extends to other areas as well. i'm joined by lauren ashburn, found over the daily download and a contributor to the daily beast. oftenly confused with hillary rodham clinton. but not politically. let me talk about this, because you're on the front all the time fighting for same-sex rights and gay rights generally. isn't
of those weird guys. i mean, because i'm not a big fan of organized religion, but i love god. >> hello, marilyn. >> as do the contestants on the the show. we went to atlanta for a casting call where before anything else, would-be players have to pass a 30-question test. >> so here's your quizzes. >> would you be able to name all of the books of the new testament in order? >> matthew, mark, luke, john, romance, first and second, corinthians, galatians and ephesians, philippians, kohl oshians and titus and hebrews, james, first and second peter, first and second third john, june and revelation. ooh! >> we are mission impossible! come on! >> the lord works in mysterious ways. >> go jesus, go jesus, go! >> 300 teams auditioned including the rockin' rabbi two rabbis and a theologian student in upstate new york who did so well they earned a place in the second season. >> think we're putting a lot of pressure on ourselves to represent. we feel like within the old testament we know what we're talking about and we should be able to show that to the rest of the world. >> cain is absolutely right
in that because all so globalization and religion and economics coming together to complicate it. if you are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why prie
religion and not the other and they're pretty gutless and-- >> they're gutless cowards, you're absolutely right and we've got a trail of evidence proving that point. >> you guys are pretending it's so easy to be a muslim in this country and the christians so-- >> wait a minute, i would expect that if there is a comedy show, everything is fair game which i would be fine with, it's not fair game and first, they know they can get away with it. >> they've gone after muslim in the past going back to our friend dennis miller going after cat stevens when he converted in the 1980's, and i'm being followed by a big muslim to the tune of-- >> remember cat stevens and he was at jon stewart's rally for quote, insanity. and here is a guy, here is a guy-- >> thises '80s, sean, if you're offended, change the channel you've got to lighten up. >> sean: i don't think that nbc would do it. >> they have in the past. >> sean: no, they have not. >> i just gave you an example. >> sean: it's not relevant. >> it's not relevant? come on. >> sean: an example. >> give me another one. >> sean: four americans died sep
was also interested in spreading religion and stuff, primarily it was about spices. why were spice is so valuable that it? well, it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe at the time. and it was. but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. it might make you feel a bit more brandy, passionate but this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day. all right? so that is one of the reasons why this became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization, the fed made a fortune exporting drugs back to europe. i drugs i mean sugar and many people consider a drug, it's where we get rum from. definitely drug, coffee, tobacco, and of course aphrodisiacs spices. so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. think about where we are today, washington dc, virginia, maryland, these were all drugs back in that time. a lot of these drugs were introduced back to europe and people look at them with revulsion. tobacco, why would you put fire and smoke into your mouth. coffee was a death penalty offense in many states for many re
curriculum. >> they are going to look closely and make sure that there aren't elements of religion in the program. >> to say it's watered down or been defanged of its religious tenets is simply in this case not true. >> the program funded by yoga nonprofit group is supported by most of the parents and the student. since starting the classes in january, students appear to be much calmer. but stay tuned. >> all right. >>> february is black history month and many schools are honoring it with special celebrations. but one bay area school honors the culture and the history all year round. and piedmont avenue elementary in oakland is this week's "cool school." >> you guys showing off, right? [ laughter ] >> okay. keep showing off. >> reporter: pope flyne has been teaching african dancing at piedmont elementary school for 26 years now. a popular musician in ghana, pope moved to the united states to teach. >> i would teach them the groove and then say you're on your own. >> reporter: twice a week students dance for an hour before school starts. >> w
and religion, under quote. the arrogance of their superiority requires this reminder. they don't rule us. they don't give us rights. we grant them power. they don't make us safe. we pay to protect them. and they don't make us free, we're free already. and as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. >> now, let's say you're against americans owning guns, i think you can't help, but be moved by this ad. more importantly, when you hear the president's soaring media and propaganda, day in and day out. at some point you can lose sight who wants this country and never forget the notion that the power of america comes from you, we the people. not from bureaucrats and government and not from politicians. that's all the time we have left this evening. let not your heart be troubled. the news continues, greta is next to go on the record. greta, take it away. >> tonight, are you a fool? rush says all of us are. >> i feel like i'm being played for the fool here. >> i think the sequester happ
, ensures our freedom of speech and religion and all the rest? i don't think so. i think the american people ensure those rights. anyway. >>> neck, full fication with a twist. a montana gun lobbyist is proposing a new sheriff's first bill which would allow county sheriffs to pick and choose which federal laws they wanted to enforce in their state. if a federal agent arrests someone without stopping in at the sheriff's office first, that agent would be arrested and charged with kidnapping the person they arrested. as gary mar bid told mother jones, the alcohol and tobacco federation might say that we have probable cause to believe that we have this person in the our county who is making firearms who ut a license and the sheriff might say, well, gosh, under the montana firearms freedom act, that's protected activity in montana, so you don't have my permission for this bust. well, this nullification type proposal was cleared by a vote by the state's republican-led house judiciary committee just this week. >>> finally, who do you think really has got the short end of the stick when it comes to t
talking about? nobody. end is the second amendment right to bear arms, our freedom of speech and religion and the rest? i don't think so. i think the people do. and a twist on a montana gun lobbyist proposing a new sheriff's first bill which would allow county sheriffs to pick and choose which federal laws they want it enforto enforce. if someone stops at the sheriff's office first, that agent would be stopped and arrested for the person they arrested. the alcohol and federation which is the atf, says someone is making firearms without a license. and gosh, under the montana firearms freedom act that is protected. you don't have any permission for this bust. this nullification type proposal was cleared bay vet by the state's republican led house judiciary committee just this week. >>> finally, who do you think really has the short end of the stick when it comes to the looming spending cuts that are set to hit march 1st? pentagon controller -- comptroller, robert hail is taking it in stride. he told the washington post, when i walk down the hall, people still wave, but with fewer fingers. i
, they cling it guns and religion, under quote. the arrogance of their superiority requires this reminder. they don't rule us. they don't give us . we grant them power. they don't make us safe. we pay to protect them. and they don't make us free, we're free already. and as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. >> now, let's say you're against americans owning guns, i think you can't help, but be moved by this ad. more importantly, when you hear the president's soaring media and propaganda, day in and day out. at some point you can lose sight who wants this country and never forget the notion that the pow
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
who have different sexual orientation is a fundamental struggle for many religions and catholicism and judaism included. i am reminded of the myth of the owl of minerva but says it is flies at dusk, but flies to late to help anyone, and the question for the pope is he is the owl of m minerva, and that he was not ultimately able to conquer to the satisfaction of many people, and he has done something that myself have many issues with the pope, but he has done something very important that he is a sort of modern george washington here that he has stepped back as someone who has worked in politics and watched a lot of people who never know when to say when and have no humility, but that to me strikes me as a fundamentally humble act. >> and it shows a lot of spiritual freedom, too, and rare is the person who will relinquish power voluntarily these days. so it is interesting that jesus points to this both backwards and forward and as sister was saying that the jesus is always going out to the marginalized and if jesus were here today -- >> okay. here we go. >> father, that is a great w
in the rye." and, of course, there was poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliot's four quartets. and we learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, open-eyed and laughing to the tomb. and i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. it's in a greek anthology translation by dudley fitz, wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in harbor, tomorrow, i said, and death spoke in that little word. o stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marveled at keats' ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across a smooth table. we hungered for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. and if we were going to be saved, we knew it would be by literature. and it was the french historian jules membership lay who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn to biography, to life writing. history, he said -- and you could think that he meant to include biography and fiction -- history, he
that in the industrialized world there is it a lot of people who don't stee the relevance of the religion and he wants to reenergize that faith. he started the uro faith . amms wrote a book evangelical of catholicism and calling for the church to deepen people's faith. janet? >> all right. thank you very much for the update. can you tell us about what comes next in the process? this pope had specific outreach, but what about the next one. you mentioned there may be interest in focusing on somebody to represent the different geoh, graphy. the process seems so secretive. >> i tomit give you ideas who may be in the top. it is important to understand the selection by what the church needs. if you go to the criteria and the church needs to reenergize. cardinal ravizi for culture. he's also the president of a different pontiffical commissions. he's leading the papal lenten retreat it is an honor to lead that retreat. two others had had . both went on to be the pope . cardinal schoola who is italian branch. they make up 25 percent of the cardinals and they center a big voting block . you can see cardinal ole
. the school said they are teaching fitness, not religion. the program that is funded by a grant started last month and the district said most parents believe it is helping reduce student stress. >> it happened just a couple minutes ago. a new bomb shell in the case of the blade runner charged with murder. why there is a new chief investigator. >> from the boat to the plate, somewhere along the line your seafood may be getting swapped for a lesser quality. we will tell you what a new study reveals. >> we he are live many san jose where there is a growing homeless tent city building at the san jose airport. we will tell you what the city plans to do about it and how much it's going to cost when we continue. t whatever you wan, baby. hmm. let's just share a 20 piece. [ internal ] 20 mcnuggets, for only $4.99? oh, man. she's beautiful smart and sensible. jackpot. [ crewperson ] anything else? [ male announcer ] mcdonald's crispy, juicy chicken mcnuggets are now part of the extra value menu. so you get the tastes you love at a price you'll love even more. guess who's going to the game? [ inter
baptist, 11,000 member congregation said christianity is right and a lot of other religions long. he called mormonism a cult. he said unkind things about islam. he's come under a lot of fire about how he talked about gays and lesbians. this is part of the reason why this controversy erupted by tim tebow accepting to speak at the church saying he was there to endorse the pastor. how they express those beliefs are much different and obviously tebow is a much softer in how he talks about his faith. pastor jeffers has been more critical about other faiths when he talks about his own. pastor jeffers has been kind enough to join us on the telephone from dallas. good afternoon. thank you for being with us. >> appreciate you having me. let me just say one thing about your report. you know, when it comes to catholicism i've said publicly there will be millions of catholics who will be in heaven because they trusted in christ the savior. i was talking about theological differences. we're outspoken in our beliefs. it's funny to me that a church like ours that simply says christ is the only way
and spreading the religion and stuff, but primarily he was about spices. why spices? why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was finish in europe at the time -- food was terrible in europe at the time before all these things in the new world, and it was, but all these spices, each new, exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. they might make you feel a bit more randy, how should i put this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day, right? so that's one of the reasons why this trade became so valuable, and people risked their lives to explore these things. so after the conquest and kohl in iization, the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them within this hemisphere as well. and by drugs i mean sugar -- which many people consider a drug -- where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, tea, and, of course, these afrotease yak spices, right? and so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. right? vast fortunes were created. think about, you know, where we are today, wa
study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. -- flora, fauna, philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among t
fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with iraqi freedom. you're looking at a nation that can go in, with a superb military capability, which her daughter is a part of, and it can make a lot of differences, but the problem you have is that you have a political situation where we cannot sustain a long- term deployment, 12-13 years in afghanistan over the long term. it has become america's longest war. economically, you look at how that works. the big problem that i have with the drawdown is perhaps related to what your saying -- you have to be very careful about what to tell the enemy. you have to have a negotiating position that gets you from the strength
of organized religion. but i love god. start the clock now. >> reporter: because it really is a game show, there are prizes. winning teams get $20,000 each episode. but there's $100,000 for the tournament champion. all prize money, however, goes to the winning team's charity of choice. [ cheers ] >> having a baby at the age of 90, memaw. just saying. nothing's out of the realm of possibility here. >> reporter: most pastors aren't as funny as foxworthy. he assured us he's not trying to compete in that arena. he knows his limitations. >> when i started hosting "fifth grader," people certainly thought i was smarter than i was, you know. and i would say, hey, if i didn't have the cards -- the shortest show on television. and now i'm doing this and people think, well, this guy has all the spiritual answers in the world. i'm like, no, i'm still the samsame idi idiot. still two decision was drywalling, you know. >> reporter: for "today," harry smith, los angeles. >>> let's head out to the plaza and check the weather from dylan. >> good morning, lester. good morning, everyone. you're from miami?
you go with -- >> as long as we're in the fantasy religion league, i won't with -- i went with soemtier. it would be to be a woman in america, that's not going to happen, but it does speak to some of the issues about how the church needs to open itself up and find herself, puerto rican, grew up in the bronx, has mixed it up in the real world and would be a good thing for whoever is pope. >> angela, who did you come up with? >> not yourself. >> absolutely not. but i think it's important to note there's 150 million catholics in africa and there is a quote that the pope said. he considers africa to be the spiritual lungs of humanity. to that end i seconded cardinal peter turkson who was recently appointed by the pope to head the pontifical council for justice and peace. he is a notable leader, and he is also from ghana. >> pope peter. >> yes, pope peter. >> that's got a nice ring to it, robert costa. >> the new millennium. i think that's a great pick. we'll hear a lot about third world choices, someone outside of italy, maybe outside of europe. if it's not going to be an amer
religious liberty. he wants to define the first amendment, free exercise of religion clause to one hour a week. that's what he wants to do. he is not our friend. >> stephanie: wow. >> that's treason. >> stephanie: i was going to say that sounded a little treasony. the president of the united states is our enemy? the enemy? that's dangerous talk, isn't it? maybe the secret service needs to borrow the giant cartoon paw. [knock at door] >> isn't that the sound the cat made when he was out for the night? >> stephanie: right. >> then the cat will stay out for the night. [knock at door] >> stephanie: that concludes right-wing world. thank god. [ applause ] >> you didn't like that? >> stephanie: no. >> started to turn. >> stephanie: 17 minutes after the hour. you know, we talk about carbonite. how great was that letter i just read the other day. an item t. specialist, someone lost everything in her computer. they called the data recovery company. it will cost $2,000. what could she have done? carbonite for only $59 for the entire year? now everybody in the office has carbonite. you have all of
. people in great distress either find religion or the courts. [laughter] that is okay. we need a road map. what we are really out lying is an ongoing mission. our ideal on both sides, because we are open to all and have a level playing field. the road maps, the clarity of language, and information flows to the ultimate consumers, it is ideal. i love the fact that at the beginning of the creation, there was the thought that information flow passivity in a certain way for a certain population. i love the fact there is one for seniors because information is channeled differently for different priorities in different times. it must reflect our diversity and the delivery of regulation. we are here for the seniors. i see so many coming to the court room see how important that is. >> i wanted to move on to discussing the short term. short-term credit ends up being a death trap for a lot of consumers in a harmful way. that brings us the issue of loans and we have seen the effects. i want to bring in dawn to the conversation. there you are. you have done a lot of work in texas around this issue. m
religion. people are rational. that's not quite true. religious lines in the middle east are critical. i think that once iran goes nuclear, we're going to have a severe sunni-shiite play, and it's seen as a shiite's bomb threatening the sunni dominance in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that, a pakistani nuclear presence, an extended, and pakistan nigh extended tee -- deterrents in saudi arabia. they financed the nuclear program. they have prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this is going to raise the question regarding, for the first time, second strike capability against india which would complicate the south asian complex. eases cay collation -- escalation risk is higher than ever between the two super powers. it's command and control. we have to address the question of how command and control of nuclear weapons are -- influences deterrents. first of all, questions of custody. in the united s
. >> we also had sister philip michael. she taught religion. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: okay. twenty-nine minutes after the hour. right back on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ male announcer ] start with a groundbreaking car. good. then invent an entirely new way to buy one. no. no. no. yes! a website that works like a wedding registry. but for a car. first, you customize it. then let people sponsor the car's parts as gifts. dad sponsors the engine for your birthday. grandma sponsors the rims for graduation. the car gets funded. then you pick up your new dodge
, such as, for example, religion or os sa fied theorys that aren't based on what actually works but based on a religious ooh ooh ooh fervor. this is not the party of burke. i was teaching burke at columbia this week. my key question to the students is, you've read burke, conservatism. you thought you weren't going to like him. yet most of you hate republicans. what's the difference? >> wait a second -- >> i'm a great admirer of burke. i understand what you're talking about. i think part of the modern challenges of the movement in america was forged in the 1960s, before the great society. so there needs to be a reassessment of how you apply conservative principles to the 21st century. that philosophical is ongoing on. >> the author of the great director of mind. if he's watching, he's losing his mind because i think the whole persuasion of burke, burke is a radical calling your revolution. monar monarchist revolution. his whole point we liberals consider a have this argument, it was good conservatism back in the day. >> burke was in dialogue -- >> exactly, the ones who are no longer in pow
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